Speeding up Yellow Glue Setting

Heat and a clean, sharp joint will help with quick set-up. January 12, 2009

Question
We are gluing a solid wood edge onto a 1 1/2" particleboard core. We are using a yellow wood glue, which is taking a couple hours to set up in the clamps. Is there a faster drying product suitable for such an application? The end product is a plastic laminated table top with wood edges. The wood edge butts onto the laminate; the laminate does not go over the wood edge. We want to speed up the process.

Forum Responses
(Adhesive Forum)
From contributor J:
I do this often, and use biscuits to help hold the glue joint long term and pocket screws occasionally to help hold the wood short term. We use the Lamello Ergo lipping planer to flush up the edge. Works very well.



From contributor L:
Yellow glues usually dry faster than that. How is the temperature in your work area - above 65F? I like to glue in temps of more than 70F. I use Titebond II and that type of glue joint would be ready in about 45-75 minutes. Make sure your edges are true and you aren't using the clamps to force the boards onto the PB. As the glue instructions always say, have a well fitting, snug joint.


From contributor C:
The previous posts are both right in line with my experiences. A clean, flat, tight fitting glue line is essential for minimum drying time. Flat, well milled edge strips make this easier.


From contributor S:
Temperature and moisture are key to successful adhesive application! What is your climate?


From the original questioner:
We are in Iowa and no, our shop is not 65-70 degrees. Our edges are dead on, so I'm going to crank up the heat. Thanks.


From contributor D:
We pocket hole and glue the edge on the particleboard so there is no down time.


From contributor T:
Buy a Woodwelder and be done in less than a minute. You can often find used ones on eBay.


From contributor L:
You can also try a cynoacrylate, or superglue. The right type will allow 15-25 seconds for setup and will provide a bond that would crack your wood before cracking your joint.